Oneironomicon

the-writers-ramblings:

i cant even make it past the table of contents im laughing too hard

explore-blog:

Gorgeous Folio Society illustrated slip-case edition of Isaac Asimov’s iconic Foundation trilogy. Also from the Folio Society, Irish Myths and Legends and the glorious Alice B. Toklas Cookbook.

thehobbitcompilationblog:

idareu2bme:

stut—ter:

idareu2bme:

lokidindeed:

i-deduce-youre-a-bitch:

YOU NIQQAS WANNA LEARN ELVISH?! HERE YA GO!

is this legit?

This is legit. My husband, sitting across the room, looks over and says, “IS THAT SOMEONE SHOWING HOW TO CONVERT ENGLISH TO TENGWAR?  BECAUSE THAT’S THE WAY!”

Believe this man.  He owns atlases of Middle Earth, the complete history of Middle Earth (leatherbound), and has read the books at least 150 times.  Also: speaks elvish.

Yes.

What if there are two vowels in a row?

Does anyone know the answer to that last question?

The Anatomy of A Hardcover

nevver:

  1. ABYSSINIAN MEDAL
    Military slang, introduced after the Abyssinian War, for a button in the abdomen area “gone astray from its buttonhole.” This is probably what happens to your vest-wearing uncle after a hearty Thanksgiving meal.
  2. AMEN CORNER
    A California term for a church.
  3. BASKET OF ORANGES
    This phrase, which referred to a pretty woman, originated in Australia before making its way to England. “A metaphor founded on another metaphor,” author Andrew Forrester writes, “the basket of oranges being a phrase for the discovery of nuggets of gold in gold fields.”
  4. BEER BOTTLE
    Not something you drink out of, but a street term for “a stout, red-faced man.”
  5. CAN’T YOU FEEL THE SHRIMP?
    Cockney, from 1877, meaning “smell the sea.”
  6. CHEEK-ACHE
    “Blushing or turning red in the face rather from the meanness of another than your own.”
  7. CUT A FINGER
    A lower-class phrase meaning “to cause a disagreeable odor.”
  8. DAMNED GOOD SWINE UP
    A term from 1880, “suspected to be of American origin,” for a loud quarrel.
  9. DIMBER-DAMBER
    A street term meaning “smart, active, adroit. One of the alliterative phrases with absolutely no meaning.”
  10. FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE
    A Lancashire term for “swearing followed by kicking.”
  11. MOUTH-PIE
    A street term for scolding, as delivered by a woman.
  12. NURSE THE HOE-HANDLE
    A term from agricultural American meaning “lazy.” You’re not being a lump on your couch—you’re nursing the hoe-handle!
  13. RAKED FORE AND AFT
    Desperately in love.
  14. SPONGE IT OUT
    This term, used beginning in 1883, meant “forget it.”
  15. START A JOLLY
    To lead applause. The next time you do the slow clap, tell everyone you’re starting a jolly.

For the confusèd among you.
Old English (Anglo-Saxon): Eft he axode, hu ðære ðeode nama wære þe hi of comon. Him wæs geandwyrd, þæt hi Angle genemnode wæron. Þa cwæð he, "Rihtlice hi sind Angle gehatene, for ðan ðe hi engla wlite habbað, and swilcum gedafenað þæt hi on heofonum engla geferan beon."
Middle English: In þat lond ben trees þat beren wolle, as þogh it were of scheep; whereof men maken clothes, and all þing þat may ben made of wolle. In þat contree ben many ipotaynes, þat dwellen som tyme in the water, and somtyme on the lond: and þei ben half man and half hors, as I haue seyd before; and þei eten men, whan þei may take hem.
Early Modern English: But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she Be not her maid, since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love!
Modern English: Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, of number four, Privet Drive, were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much. They were the last people you'd expect to be involved in anything strange or mysterious, because they just didn't hold with such nonsense.
Post-Modern English: I viddied a malchick walking down the street and this made me tolchock him in the yarbles, but the rozzes showed up and I was sent off to the roz shop and then the barry place.
Woah.  That is bizarrely fitting.
Via: francis-bonnefuckyeah

Woah.  That is bizarrely fitting.

Via: francis-bonnefuckyeah

gruntledandhinged:

ALL of this. Encourage people to try new words, to mess them up, to experiment with vocabulary, to learn complicated adjectives and verbs and nouns, because words are fun.
Also, don’t be a jerk.

gruntledandhinged:

ALL of this. Encourage people to try new words, to mess them up, to experiment with vocabulary, to learn complicated adjectives and verbs and nouns, because words are fun.

Also, don’t be a jerk.

“This is a Bookshop" from the door of The Albion Beatnik in Oxford
Via: Reddit

This is a Bookshop" from the door of The Albion Beatnik in Oxford

Via: Reddit

Little Free Library by stereotank